BrandCrap Blog

Linked: Peel got Peeled

I am never one to go with the “This cost how much?!” line of argument but this was a complete rip-off for the Region of Peel — that encompasses the cities of Brampton and Mississauga, and the town of Caledon, in Canada. They paid $95,000 Peel got Peeled


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I am never one to go with the “This cost how much?!” line of argument but this was a complete rip-off for the Region of Peel — that encompasses the cities of Brampton and Mississauga, and the town of Caledon, in Canada. They paid $95,000 for three shitty logo options and then ended up choosing something like what they previously had, which sucked. You can see all the ghastly designs at the link.

Article originally appeared on Brand New: Link.

Noted: New Packaging for Heineken 0.0 by VBAT

(Launched 2017) After two years of research and the use of new brewing techniques, Heineken master brewers created the optimal recipe for the first non-alcoholic beer under the parent brand Heineken, Heineken 0.0. This alcohol-free variant has the refreshing character, fruity notes and a light

“Feeling Blue”

New Packaging for Heineken 0.0 by VBAT

(Launched 2017) After two years of research and the use of new brewing techniques, Heineken master brewers created the optimal recipe for the first non-alcoholic beer under the parent brand Heineken, Heineken 0.0. This alcohol-free variant has the refreshing character, fruity notes and a light malty body. This delivers a real beer experience, but without alcohol.

Design by
VBAT (Amsterdam)

Related links
Morning Advertiser story

Relevant quote
Naturally Heineken wants the new Heineken 0.0 to show that alcohol-free beer does not only taste good, but also makes you look good. Together with VBAT, the lead design agency for Heineken, and after an extensive design search the new blue colour has been developed. The change to blue is exciting to Heineken as in fact only green is part of the Heineken DNA. Now for the first time the brewer is moving away from this familiar green to make sure that consumers can easily differentiate between alcoholic and non-alcoholic beer.

Images (opinion after)

New Packaging for Heineken 0.0 by VBAT
Can.
New Packaging for Heineken 0.0 by VBAT
Bottle.
New Packaging for Heineken 0.0 by VBAT
Comparison with regular can and bottle.
New Packaging for Heineken 0.0 by VBAT


New Packaging for Heineken 0.0 by VBAT
Hero shots.

Opinion
In essence, this new packaging is exactly the same as the traditional Heineken package, except, of course, for the glaring addition of a blue ring. The effect is dissonant in that Heineken is green, has been green, and will always be green. You could argue that this is NOT Heineken but the blue ring does the one thing it HAS to do: signal that something is off, that this is, indeed, NOT the Heineken you want (if you want your usual beer with them alcohols in it) and that you should put it down immediately. Conversely, if you are looking for alcohol-free Heineken, this is the perfect accent to quickly tell apart the two options. It also happens to make for a nice color combination, with the just the right kind of blue to work with the traditional green.

Article originally appeared on Brand New: Link.

Reviewed: Friday Likes 200: From Make Studio, Shuka Design, and PJADAD

Another week of minimalist-ish projects with work from Hamburg, Moscow, and Stockholm. Also: 200 Friday Likes! TWO HUNDRED. That’s crazy.

“From Make Studio, Shuka Design, and PJADAD”

Friday Likes 200

Another week of minimalist-ish projects with work from Hamburg, Moscow, and Stockholm. Also: 200 Friday Likes! TWO HUNDRED. That’s crazy.

Leni’s by Make Studio

Leni's by Make Studio

Eat Leni’s is a line of all-natural, vegetarian, muesli-based granola mixes, bars, and “bites” by a woman by the name of Leni Niki in Vienna, Austria. The identity by Hamburg, Germany-based Make Studio, exudes the friendliness of someone whose names are Leni and Niki, through a minimalist set of graphics that reduces the bars to rectangles, the bites to circles, and the granola to dots and quarter rings, all in a smile-inducing combination of colors. If you visit their Instagram page, you can see the apostrophe-smile icon that then becomes part of the wordmark, which, oddly enough, with the “i” looks like its shedding a tear. Still, the overall vibe of the packaging is so feel-good that I’m sure it’s a tear of joy. See full project

Hyperverse by Shuka Design

Hyperverse by Shuka Design

Hyperverse specializes in virtual reality, creating the hardware and software that transports users into their own world, a hyperverse if you will. Designed by Moscow-based Shuka Design, the logo is a playful take on the name and subject, showing a human falling into a black hole, which, in other contexts might be a sad concept but, here, we know they are being sucked into a black hole of awesomeness. It’s rare nowadays to see non-literal, illustration-based logos so this is a real pleasure; it’s like a logo from the good ol’ days of Michael Schwab. The wordmark is a funky, heavily extended custom design that channels Roger Excoffon, which is always a win for me, and looks like it belongs in a space-age shuttle. In the end, I wouldn’t mind falling in such a good-looking rabbit hole. See full project

IKEAtemporary by PJADAD

IKEAtemporary by PJADAD

IKEAtemporary was a pop-up shop in Milan back in 2015 that presented its Metod modular kitchen products arranged by a group of non-IKEA designers. The identity by Stockholm, Sweden-based PJADAD played off the idea of a temporary space by using a caution-stripe motif of diagonal lines in the very non-IKEA color of green, which is what I think attracted me to this project to begin with. I also think I might be one of the few designers that REALLY likes IKEA’s custom Verdana font and I love seeing it displayed in large sizes and printed on wood. The raw-ish, unfinished nature of the pop-up space is a nice complement to the tightly controlled presentation of regular IKEAs. See full project

Article originally appeared on Brand New: Link.