Tagged: BBDO

Harvey Nichols and Under Armour Take Top Film Lions at Cannes

CANNES, France—adam&eveDDB's "Shoplifters" spot for Harvey Nichols won the Film Grand Prix at the Cannes Lions festival here tonight, while Droga5's "Rule Yourself: Michael Phelps" for Under Armour took the same prize in Film Craft.

Film Lions jury president Joe Alexander, chief creative officer at The Martin Agency, said his jury was looking primarily for new ideas—approaches that haven't been seen before. "Shoplifters" certainly qualifies, he said.

"The Grand Prix goes to a new way to use security camera footage to sell a rewards card, of all things, for a retailer. It's just a phenomenal piece," Alexander said. "I think the best pieces now cross over. This one ran in cinema, it ran as an incredible viral piece. It's a very modern piece of film that lived in both worlds."

"Most of us on the jury had seen this piece on a computer screen before," added Film juror Ana Balarin, executive creative director at Mother London. "When we got to see it on the big screen—this had never happened to me in a jury room before—once it was finished, the whole jury room spontaneously started applauding. That says a lot about it. … Who would have thought that a film with a low budget, without a script, using found footage could be so entertaining and have such a rich narrative?" 

The closest contenders to "Shoplifters" included Wieden + Kennedy's "Whale" for Old Spice, Forsman & Bodenfors' "Look Who's Driving" for Volvo Trucks, and AMV BBDO's "Never Alone" for Guinness, Alexander said. 

This is adam&eveDDB's sixth Grand Prix in the span of three years for its Harvey Nichols work. It won four Grand Prix in 2014 for "Sorry, I Spent It on Myself" and one last year in Film Craft for "Monty's the Penguin." 

In Film Craft, it turns out Droga5 was competing against itself for the Grand Prix. The jurors ended up debating the merits of "Rule Yourself: Michael Phelps" against Droga5's Hennessy spot "The Piccards," before finally choosing the former for the top prize, said jury president Laura Gregory, founder and CEO of Great Guns.

"We chose this piece because, at the end, it's the one that transcended the craft and just reached out and touched us," said Film Craft juror Steffen Gentis, chief production officer of BBDO Germany. "The craft became completely invisible, and we just found ourselves completely immersed."

Droga5 absolutely dominated the Film Craft Lions this year. Along with the Grand Prix, the Phelps spot also won two golds and a silver in Film Craft (along with a gold in Film). The Hennessy spot picked up five golds in all. And Droga5's Under Armour spot with the Team USA women's gymnastics team won a gold and three silvers. 

Notably, very little virtual reality work was recognized in either category.

"VR is the technology of this festival, for sure," said Alexander. "But we struggled with it as a jury, to be honest—how to judge it. We had a deficit of judgment. I think that's probably true of a lot of us who just don't have enough experience looking at VR films and how they work. … I think we're maybe three or four or five Film juries away from having a good idea of what makes a good VR experience and a good VR film. We don't have a lot of it in our shortlist. I think one piece won a bronze [Vrse.Works' "Waves of Grace" for the United Nations] because we felt we should say something about it."

"We struggled in the same way [in Film Craft]," added Gregory. "Most people doing VR now are technologists, not storytellers. Most of the VR that I've seen globally is really lacking in craft."

See all the U.S. winners in Film and Film Craft below: 

 
—U.S. Film winners:

Gold Lion winners:      
• Old Spice "Rocket Car"
Entrant Company: Wieden + Kennedy Portland
Production Company: Biscuit Filmworks Los Angeles / The Mill Los Angeles / Revolver/Will O'Rourke Sydney

• Old Spice "Whale"
Entrant Company: Wieden + Kennedy Portland
Production Company: Biscuit Filmworks Los Angeles / The Mill Los Angeles / Revolver/Will O'Rourke Sydney

• Under Armour "Under Armour Phelps"
Entrant Company: Droga5 New York
Production Company: Epoch Films New York

• Geico "Forest"
Entrant Company: The Martin Agency Richmond
Production Company: Furlined New York / Cut+Run New York / MPC New York

• Netflix "House Of Cards – Fu 2016"
Entrant Company: BBH New York
Production Company: Reset Santa Monica / The Mill New York / Exile Santa Monica

Silver Lion winners:      
• Nike "Last"
Entrant Company: Wieden + Kennedy Portland
Production Company: Park Pictures Santa Monica / A52 Santa Monica / Walker Los Angeles

• Nissan North America "Shoulders of Giants"
Entrant Company: TBWA\Chiat\Day Los Angeles
Production Company: Smuggler Los Angeles / Rock Paper Scissors Santa Monica / A52 Santa Monica

• Geico "Check" "Reunion" "Fisherman" "Directions" (campaign)
Entrant Company: Hungry Man Los Angeles
Production Company: Hungry Man Los Angeles

• Geico "Whisper" "Spy" "Countdown" (campaign)
Entrant Company: The Martin Agency Richmond
Production Company: Hungry Man New York / Rock Paper Scissors New York / MPC New York

• Geico "Lake" "Hike" "Going Up" (campaign)
Entrant Company: The Martin Agency Richmond
Production Company: Furlined New York / Cut+Run New York / MPC New York

Bronze Lion winners:      
• Heinz "Wiener Stampede"
Entrant Company: David Miami
Production Company: Biscuit Filmworks Los Angeles / Cut + Run Santa Monica / The Mill Los Angeles

• Pepsico "Puppymonkeybaby"
Entrant Company: BBDO New York
Production Company: Smith and Jones London

• Nike "The Conductor"
Entrant Company: Anonymous Content Culver City
Production Company: Anonymous Content Culver City

• Audi of America "Commander"
Entrant Company: Venables Bell & Partners San Francisco
Production Company: MJZ Los Angeles / Final Cut Los Angeles / The Mill Los Angeles

• LetGo "Cliff"
Entrant Company: CP+B Miami
Production Company: Biscuit Filmworks Los Angeles

• National Football League "Super Bowl Babies Choir"
Entrant Company: Grey New York
Production Company: Townhouse 23 New York / Park Pictures New York / Exile Santa Monica

• Procter & Gamble "Strong"
Entrant Company: Wieden + Kennedy Portland
Production Company: Rattling Stick Santa Monica

• United Communities of San Antonio "Devices"
Entrant Company: Shooters Films San Antonio
Production Company: Shooters Films San Antonio

• Under Armour "Under Armour USA Womens Gymnastics"
Entrant Company: Droga5 New York
Production Company: Epoch Films New York

• The United Nations "Waves of Grace"
Entrant Company: Vrse.Works Los Angeles
Production Company: Vrse.Works Los Angeles

• Unicef "Unfairy Tales Series"
Entrant Company: 180LA Santa Monica
Production Company: House of Colors Sao Paulo / Consulado São Paolo / Bubba's Chop Shop Burbank

• States United to Prevent Gun Violence "Gun Crazy"
Entrant Company: Grey New York
Production Company: Supply & Demand New York / Uppercut New York

• The Hunting Ground "The Unacceptable Acceptance Letters" "Ms. Robert's Unacceptable Acceptance Letter" (Campaign)
Entrant Company: Goodby Silverstein & Partners San Francisco
Production Company: Prettybird Culver City / Cut + Run San Francisco / Spy San Francisco

 
—U.S. Film Craft winners:

Grand Prix winner:      
• Under Armour "Under Armour Phelps" (also won 2 golds and a silver)
Entrant Company: Droga5 New York
Production Company: Epoch Films New York

Gold Lion winners:
• Hennessy / LVMH "Hennessy The Piccards" (5 golds)
Entrant Company: Droga5 New York
Production Company: Somesuch London / Anonymous Content Culver City / Mill+ New York

• Under Armour "Under Armour USA Womens Gymnastics" (also won 3 silvers)
Entrant Company: Droga5 New York
Production Company: Epoch Films New York
     
• AT&T "Close To Home" (also won a silver)
Entrant Company: BBDO New York
Production Company: Anonymous Content Culver City

• Clark Street Bridge "Looking Back"
Entrant Company: FCB Chicago
Production Company: Lord + Thomas Chicago

• Adidas "Your Future Is Not Mine"
Entrant Company: Squeak E Clean Productions Los Angeles
Production Company: RSA Films Los Angeles

Silver Lion winners:      
• Nike "Last" (also won 2 bronzes)
Entrant Company: Wieden + Kennedy Portland
Production Company: Park Pictures Santa Monica / A52 Santa Monica / Walker Los Angeles

• National Football League "Super Bowl Babies Choir"
Entrant Company: Grey New York
Production Company: Townhouse 23 New York / Park Pictures New York / Exile Santa Monica

• Delta "Tell The World"
Entrant Company: Smuggler New York
Production Company: Smuggler New York

• Amerian Honda Motor Co. "Paper"
Entrant Company: RPA Santa Monica
Production Company: Reset Santa Monica / Rock Paper Scissors Santa Monica / A52 Santa Monica

• Unicef "Malak and the Boat"
Entrant Company: 180LA Santa Monica
Production Company: House Of Colors Sao Paulo

Bronze Lion winners:
• Autism Speaks "The World of Autism" (2 bronzes)
Entrant Company: BBDO New York
Production Company: Lobo São Paulo

• Under Armour "Rule Yourself"
Entrant Company: Droga5, New York
Production Company: Reset Santa Monica

• AT&T – It Can Wait "Fletcher's Drive"
Entrant Company: Smuggler New York
Production Company: Smuggler New York

• Onemoreday.today "One More Day"
Entrant Company: Station Film New York
Production Company: Station Film New York

• Girls Who Code "Girls Can't Code"
Entrant Company: McCann New York
Production Company: Tool New York

• Apple "History of Sound"
Entrant Company: TBWA\Media Arts Lab Los Angeles
Production Company: Stink Los Angeles

• Harman International/ JBL "Bigger Than Us"
Entrant Company: Amusement Park Entertainment Los Angeles
Production Company: Amusement Park Entertainment Los Angeles

• HP "Jane"
Entrant Company: 180LA Santa Monica
Production Company: Park Pictures Santa Monica / Agoraphone Brooklyn

• The Grammys "Compton"
Entrant Company: TBWA\Chiat\Day Los Angeles
Production Company: TBWA\Chiat\Day Los Angeles

• Heinz "Wiener Stampede"
Entrant Company: David Miami
Production Company: Biscuit Filmworks Los Angeles / Cut + Run Santa Monica / The Mill Los Angeles

• Target "Target Creates First Ever Live Music Video With Gwen Stefani"
Entrant Company: Deutsch Los Angeles
Production Company: Wondros Los Angeles

Article originally appeared on Adweek Advertising & Branding: Link.

JWT’s ‘The Next Rembrandt’ Wins Two Grand Prix at Cannes, in Cyber and Creative Data

CANNES, France—"The Next Rembrandt" might be a fake masterpiece, but it's awards haul here at the Cannes Lions festival is quickly becoming very real.

The J. Walter Thompson campaign for ING bank, which taught a computer to paint like Rembrandt—and produced an amazing 3-D printed portrait in Rembrandt's style—picked up two Grand Prix awards here tonight, one in the Cyber Lions and one in the Creative Data Lions. It joins Y&R's McWhopper campaign for Burger King (which topped Print & Publishing and Media) as the second campaign to have picked up two Grand Prix this year.

The Cyber jury also handed out a second Grand Prix tonight, to the Spanish Lottery's animated "Justino" Christmas ad by Leo Burnett Madrid.

While "The Next Rembrandt" and "Justino" couldn't be more different in design or intent, each used cutting-edge technology to achieve dynamic, memorable results.

Jury president Chloe Gottlieb, executive creative director at R/GA, said at a press conference Wednesday that, in so many Cyber entries this year, the technology is becoming so seamless as to be almost invisible.

"The quality of work was of such a level that its digital nature disappeared. It becomes invisible. You don't even know it's there. It's like magic," she said.

"The Next Rembrandt" was created to highlight ING's dedication to innovation and its sponsorship of classic art. JWT designed a program that analyzed all aspects of the Dutch master's intricate technique, including his brushwork, sense of proportion and use of shading, color and space. Doing so allowed a computer to create a completely new 3-D printed "Rembrandt" painting. (It was a real painting, not a two-dimensional representation.)

Adweek responsive video player used on /video.

Consisting of 148 million pixels, the portrait of a bearded, 17th-century man in a white collar and black hat was based on nearly 170,000 painting fragments from Rembrandt's body of work. Microsoft, Delft University of Technology, the Mauritshuis and the Museum Het Rembrandthuis also collaborated with JWT on the initiative.

"What we love about this idea is that the data isn't the output of the creativity, the data is the beginning of the creativity. The data is the source for creativity," Gottlieb said. "It's something that's coming from the digital world and creating a physical thing in the real world. So, in a sense, it's the opposite trajectory from work that we were judging in Cyber even just a few years ago. It's a blurring of the lines between what is Cyber and what is real."

Meanwhile, the second Grand Prix winner, Burnett's "Justino," proved an artful and affecting promotion of Spain's annual Christmas lottery, a holiday tradition since 1812.

Using Pixar-esque animation, the centerpiece three-and-a-half-minute film told the tale of a lonely security guard in a mannequin factory whose kindness toward his coworkers is fittingly repaid. Viewers could also follow Justino's unfolding story in real time on Instagram.

Adweek responsive video player used on /video.

Jury president Gottlieb said "Justino" was the whole package and really delivered across platforms.

"We were looking for this interesting intersection between idea, technology, time, craft. And everything came together in this piece of work. We loved it," she said. "This was born out of digital. This was not a TV spot that was put on YouTube. It's exactly the opposite. This was created for the digital space. And every piece of this story was perfectly created and crafted for its channel."

She added: "There's a beautiful film that's at the level of a Pixar movie, which is amazing. Then if you went to the Instagram feed that he had, or the Facebook channel, it was all different. It was all interesting, and it was all perfect for its appropriate platform. And we loved this idea that storytelling isn't happening in the same way now. There's such literacy now, and such ability to play with the materials, that the story becomes dimensionalized and even more beautiful when you experience it by watching it, and then interacting with it. It's work that has no dead ends. It keeps going. The story grows as people interact with it. You can feel its power, and you can feel its beauty."

The final vote for the Grand Prix was unusual in Cyber this year, Gottlieb added. At first, the jury was considering two virtual reality pieces for the Grand Prix—Lockheed Martin's "The Field Trip to Mars" by McCann New York, and The Dalí Museum's "Dreams of Dali" by Goodby Silverstein & Partners.

But in the end, while they adored both campaigns, they didn't feel that either was quite breakthrough enough for a Grand Prix—so they went back to the drawing board to find other Grand Prix contenders.

The Creative Data jury was similarly smitten with "The Last Rembrandt."

"We're tremendously proud of the Grand Prix. It was pretty much unanimous," said jury president Tash Whitmey, group CEO of Havas Helia. "We loved it for so many reasons. It's hard to put those reasons into words. It's a beacon for this particular category. It's a beacon for the data industry. It shows how to take many, many complex sources of data and fuse them into creativity in ways that we found inspiring, and a little scary. It raised some questions that made us feel uncomfortable around humanity versus machines, and data, and what is the art of the possible in future. And without exception, it provoked powerful feelings."

—U.S. Cyber Lions winners

Gold winners:
• (Gold Lion, Campaign) 180LA Santa Monica for UNICEF's "Unfairy Tales"
• (2 Gold Lions) Goodby Silverstein & Partners, San Francisco for The Dali Museum's "Dreams of Dali" and the Ad Council's "I Am a Witness"
McCann New York for Lockheed Martin's "The Field Trip to Mars" (also won 1 silver)
MTV New York for its "VMA Green Screens" (also won 1 silver)
VML Kansas City for Gatorade's "The Super Bowl Dunk" (also won 1 silver)
Venables Bell & Partners San francisco for REI's #OptOutside (This campaign won the Grand Prix on Monday for Promo & Activation)
Grey San Francisco for Norton by Symantec's "The Most Dangerous Town on the Internet"
BBDO New York for GE's "GE Podcast Theater Presents The Message"
Wieden + Kennedy Portand for Verizon's "Verizon in Minecraft"
Leo Burnett Chicago for Art Institute of Chicago's "Van Gogh BNB"

Silver winners:
• (Silver Lion, Campaign) The Martin Agency, Richmond, for Geico's "Fast Forward"
• (2 Silver Lions) J. Walter Thompson New York for Ad Council, Maddie's Fund, the Humane Society of the United States' "The Shelter Pet Project" and Puma's "Puma Beatbot"
M:United//McCann New York for Microsoft's "Make What's Next"
72andSunny Playa Vista for Google's "Choose Your Side"
BBDO San Francisco for Mattel's "Imagine the Possibilities"
Leo Burnett Chicago for Samsung's "Voices of Life"
360i New York for Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation's "Adaptoys"
R/GA Hustle Los Angeles for Beats by Dre's "Straight Outta"
Razorfish New York for Spotify's "Spotify Singles"
Breakfast New York for Forever21's "F21 Thread Screen"
360i New York for Canon's "Photo Coach"

Bronze winners:
• (2 Bronze Lions) Edelman New York for Samsung's "Antidiary"
• (2 Bronze Lions) – BBDO New York for Mars Chocolate North America's "Switcheroo" and Lowe's "Social Innovation Campaign"
360i New York for Oscar Mayer's "Sizzl"
EnergyBBDO Chicago for Wrigley's "Give Extra, Get Extra"
Deutsch New York for Sherwin Williams' "The First-Ever Pinterest Yard Sale"
BBH New York for Netflix's "House of Cards – FU 2016"
CP+B Boulder for Paypal's "Meet Halfway"
Havas Worldwide New York for Legacy Recordings/Sony Music's "Bob Dylan: Studio A Revisited"
CAA Marketing L.A. for Canada Goose's "Out There"
72andSunny Playa Vista for Google, Disney, Industrial Light & Magic, LucasFilm's "Lightsaber Escape: A Chrome Experiment"
Deutsch Los Angeles for Taco Bell's "Tacobot"
Grey New York for States United to Prevent Gun Violence's "Ghost Vote"
Goodby Silverstein & Partners San Francisco for The Hunting Ground's "Unacceptable Acceptance Letters"
ISL Washington for NBCUniversal's "Mr. Robot Debt Collection"
TBWA\Chiat\Day L.A. for Airbnb's #LiveInTheMovies
J. Walter Thompson New York for Tribeca Film Festival's "Tribeca Festival Reactor"

—U.S. Creative Data winners

Gold winner:  
McCann New York for Lockheed Martin's "The Field Trip To Mars"

Silver winner:  
VML Kansas City for the Tennessee Department Of Tourism Development's "Vacation Matchmaker"

Bronze winners:  
Ogilvy & Mather Chicago for S.C. Johnson's "Museum of Feelings"
Droga5 New York for NRG Solar Forecast
R/GA New York for Focusmotion
J. Walter Thompson New York for Zyrtec's "Allergy Impact"

Article originally appeared on Adweek Advertising & Branding: Link.

Promo Jury at Cannes Gives Grand Prix to the Greatest Anti-Promotion of All Time

CANNES, France—Barely a month after winning the coveted Best of Show at the The One Show, REI's anti-promotional #OptOutside campaign has scored again, taking home the Promo & Activation Grand Prix and a Gold Lion Monday night at the Cannes Lions festival here.

Devised by San Francisco agency Venables Bell & Partners, #OptOutside saw the outdoor-gear retailer close its 143 locations on Nov. 27, 2015, aka "Black Friday"—the day after Thanksgiving, and biggest shopping day of the year. REI paid its 12,000 employees for a regular workday and urged them, along with customers, to get outside and enjoy their favorite activities away from crowded malls.

As part of the push, a dedicated website, optoutside.rei.com, recommended hiking trails, and REI.com featured a black takeover screen prompting users to #OptOutside.

Adweek responsive video player used on /video.

"Black Friday is the perfect time to remind ourselves of the essential truth that life is richer, more connected and complete when you choose to spend it outside," said Jerry Stritzke, president and CEO of REI, when the campaign launched last fall. "We're closing our doors, paying our employees to get out there, and inviting America to #OptOutside with us because we love great gear, but we are even more passionate about the experiences it unlocks."

In addition to VB&P, Mediavest/Spark, Tool of North America, North Kingdom and Edelman contributed to the campaign, which entered this year's Lions as one of the big favorites.

The race for the Grand Prix was extremely tight in this category, with REI fending off competition from a very strong challenger—DB Breweries' "Brewtroleum" campaign from Colenso BBDO in Auckland, New Zealand. In that campaign, DB created a clean-burning, conflict-free biofuel from the yeast left over after brewing DB Export beer.

"Our jury was very divided. It was right down the middle," jury president Rob Reilly, global creative chairman at McCann Worldgroup, told journalists in Cannes. "They both were amazing cases. The DB campaign started an entirely new form of business for sustainability."

In the end, though, REI prevailed.

"Everybody loved both pieces, and it really came down to which one was more appropriate for Promo & Activation," said Reilly. "I tried to have the jury imagine the headlines that the press would write about this award. The one headline could be, 'Promo Jury Gives Grand Prix to Beer Company Saving the World with a Smile.' Or, 'Promo Jury Gives Grand Prix to Greatest Anti-Promotion of All Time.' So, what's the sexier headline? They're both awesome. But in the end, after an hour, we went with #OptOutside." (Obviously, we couldn't resist using Reilly's headline for this story.)

—U.S. Lion winners
All told, U.S. agencies scored nine Gold Lions in the Promo & Activation competition, with three shops taking home two prizes apiece.

FCB Chicago won two golds and a silver for "The Baby Stroller Test Ride" for Contour Strollers (an exact adult-size replica stroller allowed parents to savor the experience); Leo Burnett Chicago won two golds and a silver for its Van Gogh "Bedrooms" exhibit on behalf of the Art Institute of Chicago (a livable model of the artist's room was offered for rent on Airbnb); and McCann New York won two golds and a silver "The Field Trip to Mars" on behalf of Lockheed Martin (a school bus rigged with VR tech simulated a voyage to the Red Planet).

Along with VB&P, the single U.S. Gold winners were BBH New York for Netflix, which also won two silvers ("House of Cards: FU 2016") and R/GA Hustle in Los Angeles for Beats by Dre ("Straight Outta").

BBDO New York won a silver and a bronze for Lowe's.

The following agencies won silver: Grey New York for Pantene; McCann New York New York for Tommee Tippee; CP+B Boulder for Domino's; TBWA\Chiat\Day Los Angeles for The Grammys; Grey New York for Volvo; MTV New York for MTV; Grey New York for National Football League.

These agencies won bronze: Grey San Francisco for Norton By Symantec; Goodby Silverstein & Partners San Francisco for Sonic Drive-In; Droga5 New York for Under Armour; We Believers New York for Saltwater Brewery; The Martin Agency Richmond for Geico; Grey New York for Procter & Gamble; Alma DDB Miami for Crowdrise; Fred & Farid New York for Remy Martin; 72andSunny New York for Samsung Electronics America; Commonwealth//McCann Detroit for Chevrolet; J. Walter Thompson New York for Tribeca Film Festival; Eleven San Francisco for Virgin America; and David Miami for Burger King. 

Article originally appeared on Adweek Advertising & Branding: Link.

Sweden’s Brilliant ‘Call a Swede’ Tourism Campaign Wins Direct Grand Prix at Cannes

CANNES, France—WPP agency Ingo Stockholm won the Direct Lions Grand Prix at the Cannes Lions festival here tonight for a remarkable tourism campaign that allowed anyone, anywhere in the world, to call a phone number in Sweden and talk directly and immediately to a random Swede.

The Swedish Number, at +46 771 793 336, connected callers with random Swedes who had signed up to be de facto ambassadors—but who received no training at all, and had been given no instructions about what to say (or not say). The unfiltered nature of the campaign was what gave it its power, of course—a bold, brave move in a world of overly manufactured manicured tourism work. The campaign also marked the 250th anniversary of the abolishment of censorship in Sweden.

Click the image below to see some data from the campaign: 

You might recall that Adweek called the number when the campaign launched in April, and had an amusing experience talking to a quite unexpected Swede on the other end of the line.

Direct jury president Mark Tutssel, global chief creative officer of Leo Burnett, told journalists in Cannes this morning that The Swedish Number was the essence of brilliant Direct work.

"In a world where we text, we tweet, we snap and we have a million options at our fingertips, it's easy to mistake technology for human connection," he said. "At the end of the day, we're people talking to people. And it's really refreshing to see an idea and a campaign that unites 9.5 million brand ambassadors with the world through the most direct form of communication—which is speaking, talking. In this case, a one-to-one phone call. It's direct at its core. It's an incredibly brave idea that generated immediate response. And it's a campaign for tourism that transcends tourism to become a celebration of national pride and a potent, powerful celebration of a country's 250-year commitment to freedom of speech."

—U.S. Lion winners
Four U.S. agencies won Gold Lions in Direct this year.

Venables Bell & Partners San Francisco won two golds for REI's #OptOutside; Leo Burnett Chicago win a gold and two silvers for the Art Institute Of Chicago's "Van Gogh BnB"; Grey New York won a gold and a silver for Pantene Hair Care's #Daddo; and R/GA Hustle Los Angeles won a gold for Beats By Dre "Straight Outta."

The other U.S. Lion winners in Direct were: FCB Chicago for Contours Strollers' "Baby Stroller Test-Ride" (two silvers and a bronze); McCann New York for Lockheed Martin's "The Field Trip To Mars" (two silvers); McCann New York for Tommee Tippee "Advice Wipes" (bronze); The Martin Agency in Richmond, Va., for Geico "Fast Forward" (bronze); Deutsch New York for Water Is Life's "The Art Heist For Good" (bronze); BBDO New York for Lowe's "In-A-Snap" (bronze); OgilvyOne New York for Nascar's "The Hashtag 500" (bronze); Goodby Silverstein & Partners San Francisco for Doritos "Rainbows" (bronze); BBDO New York for Lowe's "Live Vines"; and MullenLowe Boston for Zappos' "Pay with a Cupcake." 

Article originally appeared on Adweek Advertising & Branding: Link.

Orbit Gum Gets Surprisingly Earnest in Aspirational ‘Time to Shine’ Ads by BBDO

Here's a gum for people who feel they've bitten off more than they can chew.

Wrigley's Orbit is rolling out a new campaign tagged "Time to Shine," a shift from the brand's familiar "Just brushed clean feeling" to something more aspirational.

"The idea is that when you have a clean mouth or fresh breath, you feel more confident," John Starkey, regional vice president of marketing at Wrigley Americas, tells AdFreak. "The scripts are a celebration of what can happen when you feel ready to take on your 'Time to Shine' moment."

In the minute-long anthem spot below, we meet various gum chewers who feel unsure of themselves in the classroom, on sports fields, at weddings and elsewhere. British actor Noah Huntley provides the voiceover, though he doesn't talk and chew gum at the same time: 

Three BBDO offices—EnergyBBDO, CLM BBDO and BBDO South China—collaborated on the campaign. "It is more aspirational than you'd expect from a gum commercial," says Starkey. "We've shifted away from the things chewing Orbit helps you get rid of, like food or coffee, and instead are focusing on being ready for what comes next. And those moments can be very small or very big."

Such "moments," previewed in the anthem spot, are explored in a series of 15-second clips, each with a different hero or heroine. First up, a young soccer player gets her kicks: 

"The trickiest thing on set was capturing the right confident smiles," says EnergyBBDO creative chief Andrés Ordóñez. "It can be hard to show genuine emotion on demand without it seeming posed or overly manufactured, especially when it comes to smiling."

Next, a pint-sized basketball player rises to the occasion:

Lastly, we find love at first sight on a public bus. (Don't leave the gum beneath the seat.)

That last ad seems to channel a vibe from another Wrigley's brand, Extra Gum. And given the global success of "The Story of Sarah & Juan," we wondered if perhaps the Orbit team felt "extra" pressure to perform?

"For Extra, it's about the act of sharing and connection," says Starkey. "With Orbit, it's having the confidence to be ready for your moment." 

But how, exactly, does Orbit prepare you for said moment? Will you shoot better hoops with minty breath? Is that Steph Curry's big secret? 

The emotional approach works in Extra's long-form videos, largely because the gum is tangential to the storylines, which are riveting in their own right. Also, the clever use of wrappers is just so three-hanky sweet, it's tough to be overly critical. 

In Orbit's ads, however, the product is more front and center—the chewing faces are, at any rate—and for some viewers, this could make the aspirational message seem strained or downright silly.

The work is just earnest enough to be ripe for parody or ridicule, and we wish Anonymous Content director Joachim Back had leaned into the comedy a bit harder. Still, the concept obviously isn't meant to be taken too literally, and the gum-in-cheek tone is successful more often than not.

CREDITS

Client: Wrigley, a Subsidiary of Mars Inc.
Agency: Energy BBDO & CLM BBDO & BBDO South China
Chief Creative Officer: Andrés Ordóñez
Executive Creative Director: Kevin Lynch
Creative Director: Pedro Pérez
Creative Director: Josh Gross
Creative Director: Jeff Cena
Creative Partner: Helen Sze
Associate Creative Director: Alejandro Peré
Associate Creative Director: Dan McCormack
Sr. Art Director: Jesús Diaz
Director of Integrated Production: Rowley Samuel
Executive Producer: John Pratt
Producer: Alice Chu
Director of Music: Daniel Kuypers
Vice President, CLM BBDO: Julien Lemoine
Deputy Managing Director: Laurent Duvivier
Group Account Director: Melanie Marchand
Account Director: Erin Welsh
Global Strategic Planner: Veronique Bernard
Production Company: Anonymous Content
Director: Joachim Back
Managing Director: Eric Stern
Producer: Tim Kerrison
Visual Effects: The Mill
Colorist: Luke Morrison
Design Artist: Anzie Lee, Erik Michelfelder, Anthony Morrelle, Adrian Navarro
2D Lead: Jay Bandlish
2D Artist: Andrew Pellicer, Michael Sarabia, Trent shumway, Ryan Urban
Head of Production: Andrew Sommerville
Producer: Tracey Khan
Audio: Stir Post
Audio Sound Design/MIx: Nick Bozzone
Audio Producer: David Kaplan
Audio Producer : Mindy Verson
Editorial Company: The Assembly Rooms
Editor: Eve Ashwell
Editor: 60/30 Anthem : Sam Rick-Edwards
Assistant Editor: Edward Cooper
Producer: Polly Kemp
US Executive Producer: Mary Know

Article originally appeared on Adweek Advertising & Branding: Link.

CVS Health’s Marketing Chief on Turning the Pharmacy Brand Into a Healthcare Player

When CVS Health announced two years ago it will no longer sell or stock tobacco-related products, it was a game-changing move for the Woonsocket, R.I.-based brand, one that even received accolades from first lady Michelle Obama. But, according to Norman de Greve, CVS' svp and CMO, the step was part of a larger strategy that had been in the works for the last decade to shift the brand from being the proverbial "drugstore on the corner" to a "multifaceted healthcare company." In 2006, CVS acquired MinuteClinic, a walk-in clinic provider; the next year it merged with pharmacy benefits manager Caremark; and in 2013, it bought home infusion services company Coram. Earlier this month, CVS revealed its latest initiative to combat tobacco addiction with its "Be the First" campaign, a five-year, $50 million effort through education, advocacy, tobacco control and healthy behavior programming. Adweek's Kristina Monllos spoke with de Greve, who joined the brand last year from DigitasLBi, about CVS' brand shift, Obamacare and what's next.

Adweek: CVS' decision to change its position on tobacco has helped distinguish the brand from its competitors. Why do you think that was right for the company, and why do you think it resonated?
Norman de Greve: When you want to be a healthcare company, it's really hard to sell cigarettes. What's interesting to me about that and what was compelling to me was I cannot think of another example in corporate America where a company sacrificed $2 billion of revenue for what they felt was the right thing to do. It's a stunning thing. And we know these facts are true, that more purpose-driven companies, a) millennials and consumers want to do business with … and b) it's great for recruiting. It proved out for us in both of those ways.

Do you think it's worked in getting consumers to view CVS as a healthcare brand?
We came out with this idea of helping people on their path to better health. We launched the [CVS Health] brand, we got the exit of tobacco, and people gave us credit for that. I think the question is how do we keep the momentum with consumers so that they truly perceive us as differentiated?

Is there something in the works to keep the momentum going? Is that where the "Be the First" initiative came from?
Well, we have a couple of things. We launched this "Be the First" initiative, and we just committed $50 million to creating the first tobacco-free generation. I'd say there's a couple of focuses we have. One is driving the brand into all of the [customer] experiences. So it's a little different than advertising, but it is marketing—how do we make sure people feel the differentiation and not just a story? The second is on the advertising. We're really focusing on all of the different ways we can help people. It's a little bit more tangible than the brand. [For example, if] you are on a page researching allergies, we'll highlight how MinuteClinic has ways to help you, or a pharmacist can help you. And so it's getting a little bit more specific about how we help people on their path to better health.

    

How has the shift to a healthcare player been received?
There are a number of ways we can see the impact of our branding strategy. We see it in our financial success, particularly our sustained growth. We see it in how much of the prescription market we are capturing. At the same time, our internal brand research shows that we're viewed as a health leader among influencers and large employers, and that helps enhance our reputation and attract new business. We also see it in key marketplace rankings. For example, we were recently ranked No. 27 on Fortune's Most Admired Companies list, and No. 3 on Fast Company's Most Innovative Companies list. Certainly brand building is an ongoing process, but we're pleased with how CVS Health is being viewed in the marketplace, and our success bears that out.

Has this also positioned the brand to be healthier financially down the road?
We certainly believe so. As we continue to expand our core pharmacy business, reach new healthcare channels, invest in new capabilities and build our brand, we are poised to enjoy steady enterprise growth. Last year, revenue grew 10 percent to a record $153.3 billion, with more than 85 percent of it coming from healthcare. As long as we continue to deliver on our purpose of helping people on their path to better health, we can win in a changing healthcare market.

But what will CVS do if Obamacare is repealed?
Certainly it would be inappropriate to speculate on any future changes to the Affordable Care Act. What's most important is that we are singularly focused on our purpose of helping people on their path to better health. We recognize that healthcare delivery is rapidly changing, and we've built a company positioned to play an important role in solving the cost, quality and access issues for patients, payers and providers.

Do you see any of your competitors emulating the shift that CVS has made as a brand?
I think when you look at our competitors, they'll talk a lot about beauty and health in the front of store. You've got Walgreens, and they're trying to—they'd be silly not to look at what we're doing, which I'm sure they do every day and evaluate if they should do aspects of that. But at the moment, they've decided to see if they can do something [with] Rite Aid, which takes a lot of attention and capital. That's a different strategy than we've had, which is to connect to all of these different pieces of the healthcare landscape. So I haven't seen it yet. Could it happen? Things change all the time.

Does it worry you that your competitors aren't trying to emulate CVS' new brand strategy?
No. I think what worries us is about delivering what's right for people every day in a way that creates economic value for the business.

Given that a portion of CVS' business is retail and the brand cut tobacco sales, where do you draw the line with unhealthy product sales? For example, will you stop selling products with lots of sugar?
You know, that's something we evaluate all the time. We have been putting more healthy food in the stores, but I think the thing that is interesting about tobacco is it's the thing that there is no degree of moderation that is good—there's nothing good about it. And that's what made that a pretty clear one. We have a lot of stores, and we're pushing on lots of other healthier products. And we'll continue to do that and evolve the business. I don't know if I see one at the moment that we're going to make a big statement about.

Is there a particular target you're going after?
It's partly because of the uniqueness of our business we have targets that kind of cross the spectrum. They can be older; they can be younger. We have a pretty good sense of who we want to connect with and with which sorts of offerings, and then we tailor the communications to them and the products to them.

So you're not necessarily a brand that's going to say, "We need to win over the millennial." Or are you? 
Listen, 18 to 34 is a very important group, certainly for the front of our store. And I think if you look at the millennials from the point of view of the zeitgeist and you think about solving for them, you end up solving for a lot of people. So I think that's really important. But they're not the only group.

After the tobacco announcement, CVS shook up its agencies, tapping BBDO and UM. Can you tell me a bit about those agency relationships now?
[Those agency changes] happened just as I joined, so it started before I was even here. But what we've done and what we're working on, together with our agency partners, is how to actually reengineer the way campaigns are getting constructed and delivered. We're starting from the very beginning with what is the context that's in the moment, and what's the content that we're going to have to fit in that—which is different than a lot of the marketing that's being developed. At the core, the problem still starts generally with "What's the big creative idea?" and then "Where are we going to connect with people?" We're saying, "Where are we going to connect with people?" and then "What's the idea that fits in there?"

Do you have any thoughts about how a healthcare brand should be advertising?
I think the question is, how are you helping people in a really easy-to-understand, helpful and modern way? Healthcare is very personal and I think you've got to connect with the right people and have the right discussion with them.

This story first appeared in the March 28 issue of Adweek magazine. Click here to subscribe.

Article originally appeared on Adweek Advertising & Branding: Link.

Jeep’s ‘Portrtaits’ Wins Super Clio for Best Ad of the Big Game

Marilyn Monroe. Steve McQueen. B.B. King. Jeff Goldblum. The Terminator.

With a cast like that, it's no wonder "Portraits," Jeep's stirring commercial for Super Bowl 50, is a winner.

Today, the minute-long spot for the Fiat Chrysler nameplate created by Iris Worldwide in New York, took home the second-annual Super Clio prize honoring the best ad to run during the Big Game.

"Portraits" features the faces, both famous and obscure, of folks with various connections to the brand. For example, McQueen had a love for off-road vehicles, including a tricked-out model dubbed the "Universal Jeep." And, in 1954, Monroe rode in Jeeps when she visited U.S. troops stationed in Korea. One of the average folks shown in the ad, George Speaker, drove a Jeep during dangerous missions during World War II.

Celebrating the vehicle's 75th anniversary, the ad closes with the on-screen lines, "We don't make Jeep. You do."

"I liked the restraint it showed for the Super Bowl, to not use the typical tricks," said Rob Reilly, Super Clio commissioner and global creative chairman at McCann Worldgroup. "Jeep could have easily shown driving footage or something similar, but they chose to show very little product and tell a great story."

Reilly led a committee of top creative executives who chose the game's top spot. Mark Tutssel, global CCO at Leo Burnett Worldwide and one of the jurors, said the ad "credits people with intelligence and asks you to decode it." And he praised the closing line as "a lovely thought to quietly celebrate a national treasure in a beautiful, poetic way."

Summing up the approach, Iris global creative director Sean Reynolds said, "The Jeep team referred to themselves as the 'custodians of Jeep,' which we felt was such an awesome sentiment, so we set about telling this unique story through the eyes of Jeep and its people."

"Portraits" beat out two other finalists. One was the Snickers spot below from BBDO, with Willem DaFoe recreating Marilyn Monroe's famous skirt-blowing scene from The Seven Year Itch:

The other finalist was the NFL's "Super Bowl Babies Choir" by Grey which focused on kids born nine months after the game in winning cities:

BBDO won last year's inaugural Super Clio for Snickers' riotous Brady Bunch sendup starring Danny Trejo and Steve Buscemi:

Adweek and the Clio Awards are both owned by affiliates of Mediabistro Holdings LLC.

Article originally appeared on Adweek Advertising & Branding: Link.

Jeep’s ‘Portraits’ Wins Super Clio for Best Ad of the Big Game

Marilyn Monroe. Steve McQueen. B.B. King. Jeff Goldblum. The Terminator.

With a cast like that, it's no wonder "Portraits," Jeep's stirring commercial for Super Bowl 50, is a winner.

Today, the minute-long spot for the Fiat Chrysler nameplate created by Iris Worldwide in New York, took home the second-annual Super Clio prize honoring the best ad to run during the Big Game.

"Portraits" features the faces, both famous and obscure, of folks with various connections to the brand. For example, McQueen had a love for off-road vehicles, including a tricked-out model dubbed the "Universal Jeep." And, in 1954, Monroe rode in Jeeps when she visited U.S. troops stationed in Korea. One of the average folks shown in the ad, George Speaker, drove a Jeep during dangerous missions during World War II.

Celebrating the vehicle's 75th anniversary, the ad closes with the on-screen lines, "We don't make Jeep. You do."

"I liked the restraint it showed for the Super Bowl, to not use the typical tricks," said Rob Reilly, Super Clio commissioner and global creative chairman at McCann Worldgroup. "Jeep could have easily shown driving footage or something similar, but they chose to show very little product and tell a great story."

Reilly led a committee of top creative executives who chose the game's top spot. Mark Tutssel, global CCO at Leo Burnett Worldwide and one of the jurors, said the ad "credits people with intelligence and asks you to decode it." And he praised the closing line as "a lovely thought to quietly celebrate a national treasure in a beautiful, poetic way."

Summing up the approach, Iris global creative director Sean Reynolds said, "The Jeep team referred to themselves as the 'custodians of Jeep,' which we felt was such an awesome sentiment, so we set about telling this unique story through the eyes of Jeep and its people."

"Portraits" beat out two other finalists. One was the Snickers spot below from BBDO, with Willem DaFoe recreating Marilyn Monroe's famous skirt-blowing scene from The Seven Year Itch:

The other finalist was the NFL's "Super Bowl Babies Choir" by Grey which focused on kids born nine months after the game in winning cities:

BBDO won last year's inaugural Super Clio for Snickers' riotous Brady Bunch sendup starring Danny Trejo and Steve Buscemi:

Adweek and the Clio Awards are both owned by affiliates of Mediabistro Holdings LLC.

Article originally appeared on Adweek Advertising & Branding: Link.

Mountain Dew’s Puppy Monkey Baby Super Bowl Spot Is as Odd as It Is Addictive

Big Game ads featuring puppies, monkeys or babies often win the Super Bowl, so Mountain Dew decided to fuse all three together.

Why risk segmenting your audience (What if someone likes babies but not puppies? Or monkeys but not babies?) when you can play Dr. Frankenstein and blend all three together? 

And the accompanying song, while not quite as danceable as the original spot's "Out the Speakers," is almost sure to get stuck in your head.

The 30-second spot, from BBDO in New York, will air during the first quarter of the Big Game. This is the first time since 2000 that the PepsiCo brand has had an in-game spot. 

The concept, while a bit off-putting visually, makes sense for what the brand is selling; Mountain Dew's Kickstart combines Mountain Dew with real fruit juice and a splash of caffeine.

The spot is part of a larger campaign effort, which will include digital, social and out-of-home elements. 

• For more Super Bowl 50 news, check out Adweek's Super Bowl Ad Tracker, an up-to-date list of the brands running Super Bowl spots and the agencies involved in creating them.

Article originally appeared on Adweek Advertising & Branding: Link.

Ad of the Day: Priceline Goes for Seriously Awkward Humor in First Ads From BBDO

When Priceline wrapped up its first agency review in a decade by sending its business to BBDO last fall, we predicted it would mark a departure for a brand long defined by William Shatner's campy "Negotiator" character. 

We didn't realize how dramatic that break would be.

BBDO's first work for Priceline launches on TV this Sunday during the Super Bowl pre-game with a trio of spots covering a full range of disasters caused by a failure to make last-minute travel plans. Shatner returns—to narrate—but in every other way the work is about as far from previous efforts by Butler, Shine, Stern & Partners as it could possibly be. 

In "Cousins," the discount travel company helps a young career woman avoid a situation that could have turned a fun night into a painfully awkward morning after.

 
The new marketing push isn't focused on Paris dream vacations destined to fill Facebook photo albums. "We took a hard look at today's behavioral trends, and they reveal travel's core truth: Travelers take more trips to visit family in places like Rome, Georgia, than trips of a lifetime to places like Rome, Italy," says Priceline CEO Paul Hennessey.

"We feel like we nailed the worst possible thing that could happen as a result of missing any trip," says BBDO executive creative director Chris Beresford-Hill in explaining the concept. "It could happen to anyone." 

The message is that using Priceline makes such scenarios less likely. 

A second ad, "Baby," concerns a process that many hopeful would-be parents around the world take quite seriously—finding a child to adopt. That often involves overseas travel, and in this case, a Priceline trip helps one couple avoid a very unusual baby indeed. 

 
The third ad in this trilogy of unfortunate events might be the least shocking: It concerns Social Security fraud involving one naive and impressionable "Nana."

 
"Since it was a strategic shift and we are a new agency, we wanted it to feel like a brand new campaign," BBDO ecd Dan Lucey tells Adweek. "But we kept [Shatner] because he's a great narrator and it made sense to have him present in some form; he is still greatly associated with Priceline."

Beresford-Hill adds, "We're moving away from 'The Negotiator,' but if we'd been casting from scratch for voiceover, it would have been hard to find anyone better. The very fact that Shatner is telling the story automatically makes it interesting." 

The campaign will also feature a series of microtargeted Facebook videos. "If your mother's birthday is coming up, you might get served a fake news story about the horrible consequences of not visiting your mother," Lucey says. 

You might also get shamed for taking duckface selfies after skipping Spring Break.

 
The consequences in the 27 videos now live on YouTube range from a man losing all his real and fake friends after failing to meet his brother's new baby to a set of parents punishing their neglectful son-in-law by moving in with him. (There will be bunkbeds.)

"At the end of the day," Beresford-Hill says, "our goal is to make the audience laugh with us. Hopefully the campaign makes everyone feel what we feel." 

In our case, that feeling was: Oh good God, no! 

CREDITS

Agency: BBDO New York
Client: Priceline.com
Titles: "Cousins," "Baby," "Nana"

Chief Creative Officer, BBDO Worldwide: David Lubars
Chief Creative Officer, BBDO New York: Greg Hahn
Executive Creative Director: Chris Beresford-Hill
Executive Creative Director: Dan Lucey
Senior Copywriter (Cousins, Baby): Mike Motch
Senior Art Director (Cousins, Baby): Austin Mankey
Associate Creative Director (Nana): Kim Nguyen
Associate Creative Director (Nana): Marques Gartrell
Executive Producer: Tricia Lentini
Project Manager: Amy Orgel
Group Planning Director: Tom Naughton
Senior Director: Ross O'Donovan
Account Director: John Chleborad
Account Manager: Laura McWhorter
Account Executive: Erin Oliver
Business Affairs: Shelly Bloch

O Positive Films
Director: Jim Jenkins
Executive Producer: Ralph Laucella
Line Producer: Marc Grill
Director of Photography: Ellen Kuras
Editor: Ian Mackenzie
Assistant Editor: Mike Leuis
Sound Designer: Sam Shaffer
Executive Producer: Sasha Hirschfield
VFX: Schmigital
Sound Mixing: Tommy Juacarone/Sound Lounge
Brand Music: Human
Animation: Sibling Rivalry (Brand animation), Mr. Wonderful (Life Lessons Graphics)

FACEBOOK CREDITS
Agency: BBDO New York
Client: Priceline.com

Chief Creative Officer, BBDO Worldwide: David Lubars
Greg Hahn – Chief Creative Officer, BBDO New York
Executive Creative Director: Chris Beresford-Hill
Executive Creative Director: Dan Lucey
Creative Director: Dan Kenneally
Creative Director: Ryan Raab
Senior Copywriter: Mike Motch
Senior Art Director: Austin Mankey
Senior Art Director: Brian Pinkley
Copywriter: Ricky Johanet
Associate Director, Integrated Production: Joe Croson
Executive Producer: Tricia Lentini
Project Manager: Amy Orgel
Group Planning Director: Tom Naughton
Senior Director: Ross O'Donovan
Account Director: John Chleborad
Account Manager: Laura McWhorter
Account Executive: Erin Oliver
Business Affairs: Shelly Bloch

O Positive Films
Director: Spencer Riviera
Executive Producer: Ralph Laucella
Line Producer: Devon Clark
Director of Photography: Ellen Kuras
Mackenzie Cutler
Editor: Mike Rizzo
Assistant Editor: Brendan Hogan
Executive Producer: Sasha Hirschfield
VFX: Schmigital
Sound Mixing and Design: Sam Shaffer/Mackenzie Cutler
Animation: Mr. Wonderful

Article originally appeared on Adweek Advertising & Branding: Link.