Tagged: India

Ad of the Day: See the Sweet Samsung Ad That’s Become a Major Hit in India

In rural India, people sometimes have to travel up to 50 miles just to have minor repairs made on a cell phone. Samsung is addressing this by rolling out a fleet of 535 vans to visit people who need service—and is promoting it with a heartwarming ad that's gotten more than 35 million views in less than two weeks.

The spot, created by Cheil, shows a Samsung service van driver overcoming all sorts of obstacles to pay a visit to a girl who has called about a broken television. But only when he finally arrives at the home does he realize that he's making a very special house call.

The ad has received a hugely positive response, which Ranjivjit Singh, CMO of Samsung India, said was most welcome as the company makes this service expansion.

"Our new initiative of expanding to rural India, right up to the taluka level, helps us in taking care of our valued customers, wherever they are," he said. "The new campaign video gives a glimpse of yet another initiative toward our 'Make for India' commitment. We are very happy to receive an overwhelming response from consumers across India, who have given a big thumbs up to the campaign."

Sagar Mahabaleshwarkar, chief creative officer of Cheil India, added: "Samsung is without doubt at the cutting edge of technology. But even the most advanced products need some TLC once in a while. While others might expect you to visit their service centers, Samsung visits you instead. That's the measure of Samsung's emotional investment in its customers. I am glad that the film adequately captures this warmth and commitment while balancing the rational demands of the brief."

CREDITS
Client: Samsung
Agency: Cheil

Article originally appeared on Adweek Advertising & Branding: Link.

How Clinton and Trump Can Capitalize on Knowing Their Followers’ Favorite Brands

With the presidential conventions upon us, the campaigns are focusing on the big race and how best to position their candidates to win. They are pondering clothes, hair, geography, colors, words and photo opportunities. They are listening to the polls and surveying the populace with passion. While each party's nominee is focused on policy and platform, they should also focus on voter preferences—not through polls, but through social engagement.

As a complement to traditional polling, both campaigns can take advantage of the massive scale available via social affinities. Using an algorithm-based approach to measure the engagement behaviors of hundreds of millions of social users—think commenting, photo posting and retweeting—candidates can see which brands, TV shows, movies and celebrities engage their social bases. Affinity measurement is a perpetual polling mechanism, constantly monitoring millions of preferences and passions. In contrast to social listening tools, measuring affinities identifies which entities will be most receptive by gauging the intensity of engagement between candidates and their potential voters.

For example, because Donald Trump is the most surprising candidate in recent political memory, there has been a lot of discussion about his supporters. Who exactly are they?

It's not hard to imagine that he has supporters who are more likely to drive West Coast Choppers or eat at McDonald's, something he himself did to celebrate clinching the Republican nomination. Campaigning with pal and New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady could make him resonate even more with voters. From a tactical vantage point, affinities also show that Trump has avid supporters in Phoenix which is particularly critical as Hillary Clinton has made the GOP stronghold state competitive again.

Social affinities can be prescriptive even down to the smallest details. Potential voters might not notice it consciously, but tossing Doritos to the crowd at rallies would have a big impact for Trump because of social affinity. And who knew that Trump's fans engage more with Kanye West than any other artist? Blasting "Power" at his rallies is a sure way to get the crowd going, and despite the Rolling Stones asking him not to do so, playing "Start Me Up" would also be a good choice, according to affinity data.

On the Democratic side, Clinton's branding prescription can help widen her gap with Trump and also appeal to Bernie Sanders' supporters. Aside from Sanders' own endorsement of Clinton, campaigning with documentarian Michael Moore would be a smart choice. He has a strong affinity with Clinton engagers and very publicly endorsed Sanders during the primary season.

On the campaign trail, Clinton should offer free Ben & Jerry's, a high affinity snack with engagers hailing from Sanders' home state of Vermont. If there are any photo ops at an auto manufacturer, Clinton should be sure it's where they make Toyotas. In contrast to Kanye's "Power," Clinton's rallying cry should be Beyoncé's "Run The World (Girls)." Clinton should also maintain a strong presence in Pennsylvania and Ohio, states where she has a strong fan base but could easily flip from blue to red.

Campaign managers with an eye on the polls can layer on affinity data to determine if overall engagement is increasing or decreasing. As with polls, candidates can trend positively or negatively with various brand audiences identified by affinities. For example, Hillary Clinton has gained traction with fans of MTV drama Teen Wolf since clinching the Democratic nomination. Clinton could purchase air time during the program and would be delivering her message in a highly receptive context.

By heeding the active declarations of engaged social users, candidates can source supporters from a variety of new—and sometimes unexpected—fan bases by aligning themselves with these audiences thoughtfully and strategically. Affinities are an incredibly powerful tool that belong in every campaign manager's toolbox.

J.T. Compeau leads client services for AffinityAnswers, the first industry platform for predictive branding. Founded in 2005 and headquartered in Austin TX, AffinityAnswers has offices in New York City, Chicago, Los Angeles & Bangalore, India.  

Article originally appeared on Adweek Advertising & Branding: Link.

Dove’s Latest Mission? Revamping Beauty Ideals in India

Dove's got a new short film, Let's Break the Rules of Beauty, which champions a more inclusive approach to beauty for Indian women. 

The 50-second short, from Indian film director, screenwriter and documentary filmmaker, Pan Nalin, showcases a variety of women whose look and style doesn't necessarily fit the Indian beauty ideal of "youthful looks, fair skin, long black flowing hair and a trim figure." 

"[This] is the first Dove Masterbrand campaign created specifically for India," said Victoria Sjardin, senior global brand director, Dove Masterbrand. "India is a country growing and evolving at a rapid pace and yet the traditional beauty ideal remains narrow and restrictive. In fact, our new research suggests 76 percent of Indian women believe that in today's society, it is critical to meet certain beauty standards."

According to the brand's research, the pressure to comply with Indian beauty ideals comes from external, traditional and societal factors and 80 percent of India's 631 million women believe that they need to look a certain way to do well in life. 

"This campaign is designed to encourage India to embrace its diversity in beauty, and spark change against the variety of pressures and influences that are keeping a narrow beauty ideal alive," said Sjardin. "Our hope is to genuinely start a conversation about expanding the beauty ideal and embracing the varieties of beauty that come from a country with 631 million women, 29 states and 22 languages." 

The digital campaign isn't the brand's first effort in India. Hoping to raise the self-esteem of young women in India the brand launched the Dove Self-Esteem Project in 2014. It has already educated 300,000 young people to date and, according to Sjardin, the brand aspires to reach 2.65 million young people by 2020.

Article originally appeared on Adweek Advertising & Branding: Link.

Dove’s Latest Mission? Revamping Perceived Beauty Ideals in India

Dove's got a new short film, Let's Break the Rules of Beauty, which champions a more inclusive approach to beauty for Indian women. 

The 50-second short, from Indian film director, screenwriter and documentary filmmaker, Pan Nalin, showcases a variety of women whose look and style doesn't necessarily fit the Indian beauty ideal of "youthful looks, fair skin, long black flowing hair and a trim figure." 

"[This] is the first Dove Masterbrand campaign created specifically for India," said Victoria Sjardin, senior global brand director, Dove Masterbrand. "India is a country growing and evolving at a rapid pace and yet the traditional beauty ideal remains narrow and restrictive. In fact, our new research suggests 76 percent of Indian women believe that in today's society, it is critical to meet certain beauty standards."

According to the brand's research, the pressure to comply with Indian beauty ideals comes from external, traditional and societal factors and 80 percent of India's 631 million women believe that they need to look a certain way to do well in life. 

"This campaign is designed to encourage India to embrace its diversity in beauty, and spark change against the variety of pressures and influences that are keeping a narrow beauty ideal alive," said Sjardin. "Our hope is to genuinely start a conversation about expanding the beauty ideal and embracing the varieties of beauty that come from a country with 631 million women, 29 states and 22 languages." 

The digital campaign isn't the brand's first effort in India. Hoping to raise the self-esteem of young women in India the brand launched the Dove Self-Esteem Project in 2014. It has already educated 300,000 young people to date and, according to Sjardin, the brand aspires to reach 2.65 million young people by 2020.

Article originally appeared on Adweek Advertising & Branding: Link.