Tagged: Reviewed Friday Likes

Reviewed: Friday Likes 207: From Farmgroup, brandcraft, and Studio Beau

Unplanned, all three projects this week have an Asian influence by design or setting, with work from Bangkok, Hong Kong, and Montréal.

“From Farmgroup, brandcraft, and Studio Beau”

Friday Likes 207

Unplanned, all three projects this week have an Asian influence by design or setting, with work from Bangkok, Hong Kong, and Montréal.

Holy Moly by Farmgroup

Holy Moly by Farmgroup

Holy Moly is a sweet and savory pie shop in Bangkok that has all the makings of a classy retailer, including a marble display box and copper finishes throughout, but things take a turn for the idiosyncratic with the identity by local firm Farmgroup that introduces some, literally and metaphorically, rough-around-the-edges illustrations. These take over everything, from the interior’s walls and aforementioned marble display case to the packaging, stickers, and every other application. Check out this video touring the mini shop and showing more of the applications. The result may not be your usual design cool but it has attitude and personality to spare. I almost forgot to mention that it solely uses Cooper Black, which, to me, is always a win. See full project

RPSA by brandcraft

SRPSA by brandcraft

RPSA is the work/life moniker of Romain Aubert, a self-starter, tech-world consultant living in Hong Kong but hailing from France — he has also sailed over 8,000 miles. This background is captured all in the logo by Hong Kong-based brandcraft: “The crest is designed to abstractly represent an olive tree and its roots and a ship’s hull and the waves of the ocean.” The icon is beautifully crafted and, indeed, can have multiple reads but, also, if you have no idea what it means it’s just damn pretty to look at. The logo is minimally applied to stationery in silver ink and foil and complemented with lovely serif typography, making it just a tad more subdued than Holy Moly above. See full project

Maneki by Studio Beau

Maneki by Studio Beau

Maneki is a Pan-Asian counter restaurant in Montréal, Quebec, serving a mix of dishes in a rather lively and colorful setting. The identity by local firm Studio Beau purposely takes Asian stereotypes and clichés to deliver an eclectic, vibrant, set of illustrations and in-your-face typography that may not be to everyone’s taste but is undeniably attention-grabbing. The logo itself is a super funky wordmark that challenges readability but ultimately makes for a highly distinctive logo… one that looks extra electric in neon. See full project

Article originally appeared on Brand New: Link.

Reviewed: Friday Likes 205: From Pentagram, Peck & Company, and Bienal Comunicación

A great set of striking, mostly black-and-white identities this week, with work from New York, Nashville, and Mérida.

“From Pentagram, Peck & Company, and Bienal Comunicación”

Friday Likes 205

A great set of striking, mostly black-and-white identities this week, with work from New York, Nashville, and Mérida.

Quad Cinema by Pentagram

Quad Cinema by Pentagram

Quad Cinema is the first multiplex to ever open in Manhattan, back in 1972, and after a two-year renovation from 2015 to 2017, it has reopened with stunning interiors and new identity and environmental graphics designed by New York, NY-based Pentagram partner Paula Scher. For comparison, this is what it used to look like! The new logo plays off of the name — quad / four — with a tight set of custom square letters that go edge to edge to edge to edge. In 3D application, the logo is extruded in aluminum for a glorious marquee that extends from the facade to the lobby with the logo, literally, lit at both ends. The minimal interiors are, again and literally, lit by the logo, highlighting the material and color choices throughout, especially in the four auditoriums that have each been assigned one of the letters in the name and feature a custom light fixture in the shape of the letter. It’s like the baby of Dr. Strangelove‘s war room and Edna Mode’s house. See full project

Tavola by Peck & Company

Tavola by Peck & Company

Tavola (“table” in Italian) is the Nashville, TN-based wine consulting business of Robin Riddell Jones, who knows a thing or forty about wine, helping restaurants develop their wine offerings, offering a monthly wine club, and classes open to the public. Designed by local firm Peck & Company, the identity celebrates the metaphorical messiness of life through stark splatters of paint across the materials that are offset by an elegant, custom wordmark. There is also a playful wine glass icon, drawn in a funky perspective, that adds a fun, youthful touch to the business. I really like how gold foil has been used to make the stock boxes more special with the bonus black tag. Overall, this has a great, upscale but inclusive aesthetic. See full project

Arquitectura ERRE by Bienal Comunicación

Arquitectura ERRE by Bienal Comunicación

Arquitectura ERRE is an architecture firm in Mexico City with a groovy modernist aesthetic in their residential, commercial, and office designs. The name, ERRE, is the phonetic sound of the letter “R” in Spanish, which explains the emphasis of those letters in the logo, designed by Mérida, Mexico-based Bienal Comunicación. It’s such a simple graphic maneuver, and as typeset in a minimal, structural sans serif, I found it quite smart and attractive. It’s lovely how nicely the two “R”s yin-yang with each other. The applications are a little on the dry side and there is a secondary device that are, perhaps, a set of abstract “R”s that then add up to make a pattern (best to see this in the videos at the link) that at times feels a little gratuitous but also lends itself to great details like the string around the folder. Time to roll those “R”s folks.See full project

Article originally appeared on Brand New: Link.

Reviewed: Friday Likes 204: From Luminous Design Group, Paperlux, and Anagrama

Another round of minimal design with work from Athens, Hamburg, and Monterrey.

“From Luminous Design Group, Paperlux, and Anagrama”

Friday Likes 204

Another round of minimal design with work from Athens, Hamburg, and Monterrey.

Cosmos Ocean by Luminous Design Group

Cosmos Ocean by Luminous Design Group

Cosmos Ocean is an independent, neutral
freight wholesaler in Greece that offers sea transport to ports around the world. This is not the typical Friday Likes… it’s not the typical gold foil restaurant thing but a freight company. Freight companies are not meant to look this good. They are not meant to look good, period. Designed by Athens, Greece-based Luminous Design Group, the logo is a swarm of dots forming the initials of the company that convey the idea of gathering a bunch of things into a bigger thing (cargo in ship) but what makes it stand out is that the “CO” letters are never fully formed giving the logo a nice sense of dynamism. The identity is okay; the blue on blue tones work perfectly but the Art Deco sans serif for the wordmark and applications is pretty awful, I’ll admit. Still, I could look at that swarming GIF for most of the day. (Also, apologies for the dithery image but I really wanted to include the animated GIF). See full project

Treuleben by Paperlux

Treuleben by Paperlux

Treuleben is a line of luxury calendars and stationery that have been perfect for 100 years in Geesthacht, Germany. Previously known as Treuleben & Bischof the new identity reflects the shortened name and has a handsome new wordmark and monogram designed by Hamburg, Germany-based Paperlux. Much of the visual success of this identity relies on the beautiful products but a bad logo or set of logos or even over-designing could ruin even the finest leather. The monogram is delightful and all the typography and white space is perfectly executed. A far cry from iCal, for sure. See full project

Bodega Los Cedros by Anagrama

Bodega Los Cedros by Anagrama

Bodega Los Cedros is a vineyard in the state of Coahuila, Mexico, in the mountainous, forest-y region of Arteaga. (Check it out; road trip!) The vineyard and winery is named after the cedar tree and the logo features, yup, cedar trees. While that is a simplistic premise, the execution by Anagrama is killer, representing the trees in three attractive, hand-drawn scribbles. Rendered in black on white and with plenty of white space, the trees look elegant but also earthy and the handwriting makes a great companion. The wrapping tissue paper for the bottles is extra nice. See full project

Article originally appeared on Brand New: Link.

Reviewed: Friday Likes 203: From Blok Design, Matthias Kronfuss, and Infinito

From minimalist to exuberant, we cover a satisfying range with work from Toronto, Vienna, and Lima.

“From Blok Design, Matthias Kronfuss, and Infinito”

Friday Likes 203

From minimalist to exuberant, we cover a satisfying range with work from Toronto, Vienna, and Lima.

Summerhill Market by Blok Design

Summerhill Market by Blok Design

Summerhill Market is a family-owned specialty grocery store and caterer in Toronto, Canada, offering their own private label products and prepared foods. Their new identity, designed by local firm Blok Design is a tight system that gives all the very different products a consistent shelf presence. It’s a super simple aesthetic of thin lines and a geometric sans serif (with a sprinkling of serif here and there) but all the proportions are just right with clear information and product names and a lovely, soft color palette. There are plenty more variations at the link that show what a nice, comprehensive system this is, ranging from rectangular to circular labels, blank to textured backgrounds, and a set of labels and tape for the prepared food packaging. I also like how they can turn up the volume on the coffee packaging and still maintain the look. See full project

Villa Antoinette by Matthias Kronfuss

Villa Antoinette by Matthias Kronfuss

Villa Antoinette is a luxury chalet in the Semmering region of Austria available for rent for a cool €1,500 a night because go look at it. The rental/hotel’s identity has been designed by Vienna-based Matthias Kronfuss, all in a very pleasant and elegant Art Nouveau style that echoes the richness of the chalet and its environment. The identity could have maybe used a little extra push to not just be a rehashing of a style but everything is so nicely executed that I’ll hang my hat on it. See full project

Candela by Infinito

Candela by Infinito

Candela produces and retails sustainable, ethically-sourced products that highlight Peru’s offerings and honor the workers behind them — a value visualized by the new packaging designed by Lima-based Infinito. All the illustrations feature a pair of hands — the growers’ and workers’ — interacting with the ingredients of each product. The two-color illustrations work great against the consistent brown background and the gritty shading gives the packaging an earthy aesthetic, that provide a nice contrast for the minimalist, candle-shaped logo. I’m not sure the Art Deco font works in this context but it’s still nice enough. The illustrations win the day tho. See full project

Article originally appeared on Brand New: Link.

Reviewed: Friday Likes 202: From Paloma Nieri, Sebastian Haus and Hojin Kang, and Anagrama

A food-driven collection of crisp projects this week, with work from Lima, Berlin, and Monterrey.

“From Paloma Nieri, Sebastian Haus and Hojin Kang, and Anagrama”

Friday Likes 202

A food-driven collection of crisp projects this week, with work from Lima, Berlin, and Monterrey.

Primos by Paloma Nieri

Primos by Paloma Nieri

Primos Chicken Bar is a rotisserie chicken joint in Lima, Peru, where the chicken is a rock star (figuratively speaking) and where they have dedicated a wall to faux concert posters with chicken motifs. Designed by local designer Paloma Nieri in collaboration with creative director Roni Heredia, illustrator Israelo del mundo de papel, and letterer Lu Nolasco, the restaurant is a wild mix of chicken illustrations and lettering that makes eating rotisserie chicken quite exciting. Keeping all the disparate elements together is the condensed Primos wordmark and a Bauhaus-meets-AC/DC chicken icon that surely knows how to take things up to 11. See full project

Feiner Herr by Sebastian Haus and Hojin Kang

Sebastian Haus and Hojin Kang

Feiner Herr is a food truck roaming the streets of Berlin, Germany, serving modern takes on the pancake. Far from the IHOP aesthetic, the identity designed by Hamburg, Germany-based Sebastian Haus and local Hojin Kang, brings to life the name (which translates to “Fine Gentleman”) with a Bauhaus-meets-Downton Abbey logo that makes for a great spokesman. The crisp, geometric icon is complemented by a series of Art Deco, abstract-pancake tiles that provide lovely textures and things to ogle at while you wait for some fluffy, high-end pancakes. See full project

Winter Milk by Anagrama

Winter Milk by Anagrama

Winter Milk is a chain of ice cream shops in Monterrey, Mexico, that has just gotten a Bauhaus-mee… no, sorry, it doesn’t work on this one. Designed by Anagrama, the identity has a deliberate Wes Anderson vibe with a lot of spaced-out Futura and a peppy color palette. As usual, the typography all around is great, with some complementary script and condensed Futura variations thrown in for good measure. Most of the identity elements are straight out of 1950s diners so there is nothing new per se but everything is so well calibrated and modernized that it’s hard not to enjoy it. See full project

Article originally appeared on Brand New: Link.

Reviewed: Friday Likes 201: From Enrique Presa, Foxtrot, and Tsto

Clean, bold, and crisp designs and typography abound this week, with work from Palma de Mallorca, Austin, and Helsinki.

“From Enrique Presa, Foxtrot, and Tsto”

Friday Likes 201

Clean, bold, and crisp designs and typography abound this week, with work from Palma de Mallorca, Austin, and Helsinki.

Aliat by Enrique Presa

Aliat by Enrique Presa

Aliat Asesores is a labor, accounting, and tax advice firm in Palma de Mallorca, Spain. The name means “Ally” in Catalan, which is apt given the tight alliance between the “a” and the “t” in the logo. Designed by local designer Enrique Presa, this is a rarely well done ligature that is unusual (from the fi fl common ligatures) and works great to form a tight, bold wordmark. The application on brown and tan paper with white ink is sophisticated and striking. I would totally take their tax advice. See full project

Flyrite by Foxtrot

Flyrite by Foxtrot

Flyrite is a small chain of chicken sandwiches in Austin, TX, with only two locations but they are two locations that stand out wildly, with a giant triangle thing and a neon logo on the facade that are hard to miss. Designed by local firm Foxtrot, the logo features a chicken flying just rite… it’s a great icon with crisp, strong lines and a bonus “F” hidden in its wing. The strength of the logo carries the whole identity, which is fairly basic in a coral red and gray color palette and minimal additional graphics. It’s the cool, industrial cousin Chick-fil-A never knew it had. See full project

Lundén Architecture Company by Tsto

Lundén Architecture Company by Tsto

Lundén Architecture Company is, as its name implies, an architecture company in Helsinki, Finland, with a portfolio of some pretty cool and out of the ordinary projects that support the equally out-there new logo designed by local firm Tsto. A simple wordmark, typeset in FF Bau is given a literal twist by breaking apart the letterforms into spin-able pieces that separate and come together cyclically in a hypnotic animation. The stroked approach gives it an extra layer of WTFness but it works perfectly in synch with the type of work done by Lundén. The backs of the business cards with the different states of the animation are each wonderful typographic compositions on their own. See full projectVia BP&O

Article originally appeared on Brand New: Link.

Reviewed: Friday Likes 200: From Make Studio, Shuka Design, and PJADAD

Another week of minimalist-ish projects with work from Hamburg, Moscow, and Stockholm. Also: 200 Friday Likes! TWO HUNDRED. That’s crazy.

“From Make Studio, Shuka Design, and PJADAD”

Friday Likes 200

Another week of minimalist-ish projects with work from Hamburg, Moscow, and Stockholm. Also: 200 Friday Likes! TWO HUNDRED. That’s crazy.

Leni’s by Make Studio

Leni's by Make Studio

Eat Leni’s is a line of all-natural, vegetarian, muesli-based granola mixes, bars, and “bites” by a woman by the name of Leni Niki in Vienna, Austria. The identity by Hamburg, Germany-based Make Studio, exudes the friendliness of someone whose names are Leni and Niki, through a minimalist set of graphics that reduces the bars to rectangles, the bites to circles, and the granola to dots and quarter rings, all in a smile-inducing combination of colors. If you visit their Instagram page, you can see the apostrophe-smile icon that then becomes part of the wordmark, which, oddly enough, with the “i” looks like its shedding a tear. Still, the overall vibe of the packaging is so feel-good that I’m sure it’s a tear of joy. See full project

Hyperverse by Shuka Design

Hyperverse by Shuka Design

Hyperverse specializes in virtual reality, creating the hardware and software that transports users into their own world, a hyperverse if you will. Designed by Moscow-based Shuka Design, the logo is a playful take on the name and subject, showing a human falling into a black hole, which, in other contexts might be a sad concept but, here, we know they are being sucked into a black hole of awesomeness. It’s rare nowadays to see non-literal, illustration-based logos so this is a real pleasure; it’s like a logo from the good ol’ days of Michael Schwab. The wordmark is a funky, heavily extended custom design that channels Roger Excoffon, which is always a win for me, and looks like it belongs in a space-age shuttle. In the end, I wouldn’t mind falling in such a good-looking rabbit hole. See full project

IKEAtemporary by PJADAD

IKEAtemporary by PJADAD

IKEAtemporary was a pop-up shop in Milan back in 2015 that presented its Metod modular kitchen products arranged by a group of non-IKEA designers. The identity by Stockholm, Sweden-based PJADAD played off the idea of a temporary space by using a caution-stripe motif of diagonal lines in the very non-IKEA color of green, which is what I think attracted me to this project to begin with. I also think I might be one of the few designers that REALLY likes IKEA’s custom Verdana font and I love seeing it displayed in large sizes and printed on wood. The raw-ish, unfinished nature of the pop-up space is a nice complement to the tightly controlled presentation of regular IKEAs. See full project

Article originally appeared on Brand New: Link.

Reviewed: Friday Likes 199: From Treceveinte, BVD, and Project M Plus

Plenty of elegance this week with work from León, Stockholm, and Los Angeles.

“From Treceveinte, BVD, and Project M Plus”

Friday Likes 199

Plenty of elegance this week with work from León, Stockholm, and Los Angeles.

Evoca Editorial by Treceveinte

Evoca Editorial by Treceveinte

Evoca is a publishing company that transforms real people’s lives and stories into literary works and memoirs. The name means “evoke” in English. The identity, designed by León, Guanajuato-based Treceveinte, aims to conjure an elegant, treasure-like feeling with a classic, chiseled serif that has rich, wide, open counterspaces and a lovely icon that’s a combination of fountain pen with lines symbolizing paragraphs in the shape of an “E”. I like that it also looks like a flag but above all I really like squiggle texture of the lines. The icon also has an ex-libris, vintage-publishing-house aesthetic that’s great. The gold foil on the gray stock looks lovely as does the off-white stock. The typography throughout the applications is crisp and, well, literary. See full project

Combo Combo by BVD

Combo Combo by BVD

Combo Combo is a pizza/salad/wrap fast casual restaurant in Norrköping, Sweden, that, as the name implies, allows customers to easily create their combo of toppings. Designed by Stockholm, Sweden-based BVD, the logo makes good use of the name by rotating “COMBO” 180 degrees in a deadpan sans serif, creating an intriguing set of counterspaces. One of the “O”s gets turned into a face which, although perhaps unnecessary, adds a quirky secondary element to the identity that also happens to look like a pizza with three really large pepperoni slices. What sealed the deal for me was the custom metal logo grill inside the oven. That’s boss. See full project

Lewis Miller Design by Project M Plus

Lewis Miller Design by Project M Plus

Lewis Miller Design is an event and floral design company based in New York, NY, with a large team conceiving and deploying rich, epic, elegant floral arrangements — traits reflected in their identity, designed by Los Angeles, CA-based Project M Plus. The logo is an elegant wordmark typeset in GT Sectra and is complemented by a classic monogram of interlocking LMD serif letters. The exuberance of the floral arrangements is expressed through close-up photographs of flowers printed with gold foil on top to create a whirring layering effect. The business card and letterhead have a hipster-y but elegant 90-degree-increment layout and the bags look great in that rich blue color, but my favorite element might be the tape. See full project

Article originally appeared on Brand New: Link.

Reviewed: Friday Likes 198: From Monotypo, Chmela, and Bond

A fairly wide variety of styles and clients this week, with work from Guadalajara, Macov, and Helsinki.

“From Monotypo, Chmela, and Bond”

Friday Likes 198

A fairly wide variety of styles and clients this week, with work from Guadalajara, Macov, and Helsinki.

Evreka by Monotypo

Evreka by Monotypo

Evreka is a dermatology company with a line of cosmetic creams available in Mexico. Designed by Guadalajara, Mexico-based Monotypo, the identity is visually tactile with a great combination of lightly-colored stocks, rainbow foil stamping, rainbow metallic paper, and watercolor-y accents. It’s maybe one too many elements but they are all so soft in tone and presence that it’s not overwhelming. The logo… I like it okay but I mostly appreciate its play with counterspace with the face being a drop of cream. The wordmark is also okay and works well to immediately convey cosmetics. I would rub that.See full project

Next festival 2016 by Chmela

Next festival 2016 by Chmela

Next Festival is a music and sound art festival in Bratislava, Slovakia, with an experimental outlook and representing everything from classical to electronic music. 2016’s identity, designed by Macov, Slovakia-based Chmela features a brutalist-looking “NEXT” wordmark that starts ugly and gets uglier in use or as you roll your mouse over on the festival’s site. I know this isn’t going to be the most popular Friday Likes selection ever but I really dig the don’t-give-a-fuck-ness of it. I particularly like how “NEXT” is done all in a single, continuous line and how the disruption then blows up all the vector points in every direction but always keeping the continuous line intact. In application, I think they could have used slightly less distorted versions of the logo so that, for those willing to, there would be a readable “NEXT”. If you need me, I’ll be mousing over the logo for the next hour or so. See full project

Well Coffee by Bond

Well Coffee by Bond

Well Coffee is a new coffee shop in Helsinki with the distinction that it’s vegetarian. The new identity designed by local firm Bond revolves around a custom typeface with little waves at its feet. Why little waves at its feet? I really don’t know, but it’s somehow totally appropriate for a vegetarian coffee shop in Helsinki. The type looks crisp and friendly and pairs great with the polka dot pattern, which itself works great as a shading texture for the charming illustrations. The brown, light blue, and white color palette give everything a nice freshness and is perfectly in tune with the physical space itself. Well, then. See full project

Article originally appeared on Brand New: Link.

Reviewed: Friday Likes 197: From Thirst, Collins, and Tricota

Some crisp modernism sandwiched in between two highly expressive breweries this week, with work from Glasgow, New York, and Buenos Aires.

“From Thirst, Collins, and Tricota”

Friday Likes 197

Some crisp modernism sandwiched in between two highly expressive breweries this week, with work from Glasgow, New York, and Buenos Aires.

Commonwealth Brewing Co. by Thirst

Commonwealth Brewing Co. by Thirst

Commonwealth Brewing Co. is a microbrewery in Virginia Beach, VA, that honors “farmhouse traditions, huge hop American styles, and the complex depths of wild fermentations.” I don’t know what farmhouse tradition says “Ye shalt have wicked-ass packaging” but the cans designed by Glasgow, UK-based Thirtst are wicked-ass, which I know isn’t even a term anyone uses but that’s how off the spectrum these cans are. The textures were created by letting different oils, vinegars, and inks interact and they abstractly represent the funky names of the beers: Wapatoolie, Papi Chulo, Marvolo, and Aureole. The logo and typography are arguably too light but the backgrounds are so awesome and distinctive that they would be easily identified on store shelves (even though most sales happen at Commonwealth’s facility and tasting room in a renovated fire station). See full project

Modern by Dwell Magazine by Collins

Modern by Dwell Magazine by Collins

Modern by Dwell Magazine is a new line of home products available exclusively at Target designed in partnership with Dwell magazine with a minimalist, modern aesthetic. The identity and packaging, designed by New York, NY-based Collins, working with the Target Creative Team, has a stunning simplicity and sharpness that hinges on a great wordmark for “Modern” that always sits perpendicular to the canvas (be it a box or a hang tag) creating some great tension. The yellow, gray, and black color palette is unexpected for a mainstream home decor product and it helps accentuate the product photography and I’m sure it has a fantastic shelf presence at the visually-overloading environment that is Target. Bonus points for beautiful project photography. See full project (Via BP&O)

Filidoro Artesanal by Tricota

Filidoro Artesanal by Tricota

Filidoro Artesanal is a microbrewery in Buenos Aires, Argentina, with a rooster-fronting identity designed by local firm Tricota. The rooster has a great, rugged personality with a multi-photocopied texture that makes for a cool recurring aesthetic. I love how they have pimped the rooster for the different beers, keeping the same expression throughout but adding funnily embarrassing flourishes like a pompadour, a monocle, and Irish hat. No offense to anyone who wears these on a regular basis. The typography is a little on the urban lumberjack hipster aesthetic but it goes really well with the rooster drawing, works great with the low-fi applications, and clearly shows a company wanting to have fun with its product. See full project

Article originally appeared on Brand New: Link.