Tagged: Reviewed Friday Likes

Reviewed: Friday Likes 200: From Make Studio, Shuka Design, and PJADAD

Another week of minimalist-ish projects with work from Hamburg, Moscow, and Stockholm. Also: 200 Friday Likes! TWO HUNDRED. That’s crazy.

“From Make Studio, Shuka Design, and PJADAD”

Friday Likes 200

Another week of minimalist-ish projects with work from Hamburg, Moscow, and Stockholm. Also: 200 Friday Likes! TWO HUNDRED. That’s crazy.

Leni’s by Make Studio

Leni's by Make Studio

Eat Leni’s is a line of all-natural, vegetarian, muesli-based granola mixes, bars, and “bites” by a woman by the name of Leni Niki in Vienna, Austria. The identity by Hamburg, Germany-based Make Studio, exudes the friendliness of someone whose names are Leni and Niki, through a minimalist set of graphics that reduces the bars to rectangles, the bites to circles, and the granola to dots and quarter rings, all in a smile-inducing combination of colors. If you visit their Instagram page, you can see the apostrophe-smile icon that then becomes part of the wordmark, which, oddly enough, with the “i” looks like its shedding a tear. Still, the overall vibe of the packaging is so feel-good that I’m sure it’s a tear of joy. See full project

Hyperverse by Shuka Design

Hyperverse by Shuka Design

Hyperverse specializes in virtual reality, creating the hardware and software that transports users into their own world, a hyperverse if you will. Designed by Moscow-based Shuka Design, the logo is a playful take on the name and subject, showing a human falling into a black hole, which, in other contexts might be a sad concept but, here, we know they are being sucked into a black hole of awesomeness. It’s rare nowadays to see non-literal, illustration-based logos so this is a real pleasure; it’s like a logo from the good ol’ days of Michael Schwab. The wordmark is a funky, heavily extended custom design that channels Roger Excoffon, which is always a win for me, and looks like it belongs in a space-age shuttle. In the end, I wouldn’t mind falling in such a good-looking rabbit hole. See full project

IKEAtemporary by PJADAD

IKEAtemporary by PJADAD

IKEAtemporary was a pop-up shop in Milan back in 2015 that presented its Metod modular kitchen products arranged by a group of non-IKEA designers. The identity by Stockholm, Sweden-based PJADAD played off the idea of a temporary space by using a caution-stripe motif of diagonal lines in the very non-IKEA color of green, which is what I think attracted me to this project to begin with. I also think I might be one of the few designers that REALLY likes IKEA’s custom Verdana font and I love seeing it displayed in large sizes and printed on wood. The raw-ish, unfinished nature of the pop-up space is a nice complement to the tightly controlled presentation of regular IKEAs. See full project

Article originally appeared on Brand New: Link.

Reviewed: Friday Likes 199: From Treceveinte, BVD, and Project M Plus

Plenty of elegance this week with work from León, Stockholm, and Los Angeles.

“From Treceveinte, BVD, and Project M Plus”

Friday Likes 199

Plenty of elegance this week with work from León, Stockholm, and Los Angeles.

Evoca Editorial by Treceveinte

Evoca Editorial by Treceveinte

Evoca is a publishing company that transforms real people’s lives and stories into literary works and memoirs. The name means “evoke” in English. The identity, designed by León, Guanajuato-based Treceveinte, aims to conjure an elegant, treasure-like feeling with a classic, chiseled serif that has rich, wide, open counterspaces and a lovely icon that’s a combination of fountain pen with lines symbolizing paragraphs in the shape of an “E”. I like that it also looks like a flag but above all I really like squiggle texture of the lines. The icon also has an ex-libris, vintage-publishing-house aesthetic that’s great. The gold foil on the gray stock looks lovely as does the off-white stock. The typography throughout the applications is crisp and, well, literary. See full project

Combo Combo by BVD

Combo Combo by BVD

Combo Combo is a pizza/salad/wrap fast casual restaurant in Norrköping, Sweden, that, as the name implies, allows customers to easily create their combo of toppings. Designed by Stockholm, Sweden-based BVD, the logo makes good use of the name by rotating “COMBO” 180 degrees in a deadpan sans serif, creating an intriguing set of counterspaces. One of the “O”s gets turned into a face which, although perhaps unnecessary, adds a quirky secondary element to the identity that also happens to look like a pizza with three really large pepperoni slices. What sealed the deal for me was the custom metal logo grill inside the oven. That’s boss. See full project

Lewis Miller Design by Project M Plus

Lewis Miller Design by Project M Plus

Lewis Miller Design is an event and floral design company based in New York, NY, with a large team conceiving and deploying rich, epic, elegant floral arrangements — traits reflected in their identity, designed by Los Angeles, CA-based Project M Plus. The logo is an elegant wordmark typeset in GT Sectra and is complemented by a classic monogram of interlocking LMD serif letters. The exuberance of the floral arrangements is expressed through close-up photographs of flowers printed with gold foil on top to create a whirring layering effect. The business card and letterhead have a hipster-y but elegant 90-degree-increment layout and the bags look great in that rich blue color, but my favorite element might be the tape. See full project

Article originally appeared on Brand New: Link.

Reviewed: Friday Likes 198: From Monotypo, Chmela, and Bond

A fairly wide variety of styles and clients this week, with work from Guadalajara, Macov, and Helsinki.

“From Monotypo, Chmela, and Bond”

Friday Likes 198

A fairly wide variety of styles and clients this week, with work from Guadalajara, Macov, and Helsinki.

Evreka by Monotypo

Evreka by Monotypo

Evreka is a dermatology company with a line of cosmetic creams available in Mexico. Designed by Guadalajara, Mexico-based Monotypo, the identity is visually tactile with a great combination of lightly-colored stocks, rainbow foil stamping, rainbow metallic paper, and watercolor-y accents. It’s maybe one too many elements but they are all so soft in tone and presence that it’s not overwhelming. The logo… I like it okay but I mostly appreciate its play with counterspace with the face being a drop of cream. The wordmark is also okay and works well to immediately convey cosmetics. I would rub that.See full project

Next festival 2016 by Chmela

Next festival 2016 by Chmela

Next Festival is a music and sound art festival in Bratislava, Slovakia, with an experimental outlook and representing everything from classical to electronic music. 2016’s identity, designed by Macov, Slovakia-based Chmela features a brutalist-looking “NEXT” wordmark that starts ugly and gets uglier in use or as you roll your mouse over on the festival’s site. I know this isn’t going to be the most popular Friday Likes selection ever but I really dig the don’t-give-a-fuck-ness of it. I particularly like how “NEXT” is done all in a single, continuous line and how the disruption then blows up all the vector points in every direction but always keeping the continuous line intact. In application, I think they could have used slightly less distorted versions of the logo so that, for those willing to, there would be a readable “NEXT”. If you need me, I’ll be mousing over the logo for the next hour or so. See full project

Well Coffee by Bond

Well Coffee by Bond

Well Coffee is a new coffee shop in Helsinki with the distinction that it’s vegetarian. The new identity designed by local firm Bond revolves around a custom typeface with little waves at its feet. Why little waves at its feet? I really don’t know, but it’s somehow totally appropriate for a vegetarian coffee shop in Helsinki. The type looks crisp and friendly and pairs great with the polka dot pattern, which itself works great as a shading texture for the charming illustrations. The brown, light blue, and white color palette give everything a nice freshness and is perfectly in tune with the physical space itself. Well, then. See full project

Article originally appeared on Brand New: Link.

Reviewed: Friday Likes 197: From Thirst, Collins, and Tricota

Some crisp modernism sandwiched in between two highly expressive breweries this week, with work from Glasgow, New York, and Buenos Aires.

“From Thirst, Collins, and Tricota”

Friday Likes 197

Some crisp modernism sandwiched in between two highly expressive breweries this week, with work from Glasgow, New York, and Buenos Aires.

Commonwealth Brewing Co. by Thirst

Commonwealth Brewing Co. by Thirst

Commonwealth Brewing Co. is a microbrewery in Virginia Beach, VA, that honors “farmhouse traditions, huge hop American styles, and the complex depths of wild fermentations.” I don’t know what farmhouse tradition says “Ye shalt have wicked-ass packaging” but the cans designed by Glasgow, UK-based Thirtst are wicked-ass, which I know isn’t even a term anyone uses but that’s how off the spectrum these cans are. The textures were created by letting different oils, vinegars, and inks interact and they abstractly represent the funky names of the beers: Wapatoolie, Papi Chulo, Marvolo, and Aureole. The logo and typography are arguably too light but the backgrounds are so awesome and distinctive that they would be easily identified on store shelves (even though most sales happen at Commonwealth’s facility and tasting room in a renovated fire station). See full project

Modern by Dwell Magazine by Collins

Modern by Dwell Magazine by Collins

Modern by Dwell Magazine is a new line of home products available exclusively at Target designed in partnership with Dwell magazine with a minimalist, modern aesthetic. The identity and packaging, designed by New York, NY-based Collins, working with the Target Creative Team, has a stunning simplicity and sharpness that hinges on a great wordmark for “Modern” that always sits perpendicular to the canvas (be it a box or a hang tag) creating some great tension. The yellow, gray, and black color palette is unexpected for a mainstream home decor product and it helps accentuate the product photography and I’m sure it has a fantastic shelf presence at the visually-overloading environment that is Target. Bonus points for beautiful project photography. See full project (Via BP&O)

Filidoro Artesanal by Tricota

Filidoro Artesanal by Tricota

Filidoro Artesanal is a microbrewery in Buenos Aires, Argentina, with a rooster-fronting identity designed by local firm Tricota. The rooster has a great, rugged personality with a multi-photocopied texture that makes for a cool recurring aesthetic. I love how they have pimped the rooster for the different beers, keeping the same expression throughout but adding funnily embarrassing flourishes like a pompadour, a monocle, and Irish hat. No offense to anyone who wears these on a regular basis. The typography is a little on the urban lumberjack hipster aesthetic but it goes really well with the rooster drawing, works great with the low-fi applications, and clearly shows a company wanting to have fun with its product. See full project

Article originally appeared on Brand New: Link.

Reviewed: Friday Likes 196: From Lukas Vanco, Hyperquake, and Richards Partners

Some bold simplicity throughout the projects this week, with work from Bratislava, Cincinnati, and Newmarket.

“From Lukas Vanco, Hyperquake, and Richards Partners”

Friday Likes 196

Some bold simplicity throughout the projects this week, with work from Bratislava, Cincinnati, and Newmarket.

Magneting by Lukas Vanco

Magneting by Lukas Vanco

Magneting is an online marketing agency based in Bratislava, Slovakia, helping their clients through data analysis and measurement, which served as the trigger for the identity by local designer Lukas Vanco: “[The] visual brand concept is inspired on waving as a process of data acquisition. Also works great in relation to the name- vibration, tension and rhythm in meaning of magnetism.” Something might be getting lost in translation but, yeah, I get it. I really dig the different, wonky “M”s and “MMMM” patterns and how they can adapt to different heights. The wordmark is okay and the overall typography could use some extra oomph but the general texture and dynamism created by the “M”s has a certain kind of… I don’t know… attractive magnetism. See full project

The Garage Group by Hyperquake

The Garage Group by Hyperquake

The Garage Group is an innovation and growth strategy firm in Cincinnati, OH, that, you guessed it, started its business in a garage. Originally a 2-person firm, it now has over a dozen employees not in a garage. The original logo already featured one of those classic, unfinished, unadorned light bulbs you find in creepy basements and garages with the little chain to turn on but as you’ll see on the project link, it was kind of crummy. The new logo by local firm Hyperquake fixes the original concept beautifully with a rugged, industrial aesthetic that resolves into a bad-ass, badge-like logo. The wordmark is garage-y as well but doesn’t go full grunge to avoid scaring clients. The applications are okay but, to me, the highlight was the light bulb logo. See full project

Fabric by Richards Partners

Fabric by Richards Partners

Fabric is a residential development in Onehunga, a suburb of Auckland City in New Zealand with many industrial businesses setting up shop there. The development takes its name from the site’s previous life as a clothing factory. The identity by Newmarket, Auckland-based Richards Partners brings the name to life with “fabric” letters stitched together with hyphens. Each character in the alphabet is the width of “F-A-B-R-I-C” repeated vertically 14 times. The letters have a great texture small and when used big, as in the cover, it takes a minute to see the “F”, giving the identity two different feels and ways of showing of the letters. The applications are elegant and contemporary with crisp layouts and a simple color palette. See full project

Article originally appeared on Brand New: Link.